UN SDG #3 Good Health and Well-being UN SDG #3
UN SDG #1 No Poverty UN SDG #1

challenge

0 shares

Providing Health Care Options for Those Without Coverage

With each passing year, the number of people without health care in this country increases. In 2018, 27 million people did not have access to healthcare, and private health insurance coverage remained more prevalent than public healthcare. This is preventing crucial healthcare resources from reaching those in need.

challenge

0 shares

Providing Health Care Options for Those Without Coverage

With each passing year, the number of people without health care in this country increases. In 2018, 27 million people did not have access to healthcare, and private health insurance coverage remained more prevalent than public healthcare. This is preventing crucial healthcare resources from reaching those in need.
28M
people impacted
$1.8T
potential funding
the problem
Nature and Context

With each passing year, the number of people without health care in this country increases. In 2018, 27 million people did not have access to healthcare, and private health insurance coverage remained more prevalent than public healthcare. This is preventing crucial healthcare resources from reaching those in need. The most popular health care coverage is through those that are employed, yet there are millions of unemployed Americans in this country. It is essential that we make sure clinical resources are being provided to those that need it.

Symptoms and Causes

the impact
Negative Effects
Economic Impact
Success Metrics
who benefits from solving this problem
Organization Types
Stakeholders
financial insights
Current Funding
Potential Solution Funding
ideas
Ideas Description

2013 Physical Computing Healthcare systems are synonymous with doctors and hospitals, wards and beds. Yet traditional solutions such as these, which rely on expensive professionals and heavy-duty infrastructure, are well beyond the reach of people in most of the poorest parts of the world. Sick people living in villages in remote rural areas in Kenya, for example, are lucky to see a nurse, let alone a doctor in a clinic. A typical village will rely on a community health worker and local, informal healers, with limited expertise. The Clinical Patient Administration Kit (CliniPAK), which is trialling in the Trans Mara District in Kenya, aims to ameliorate those inequalities with a portable, robust, self-contained “clinic in a box” that is powered by a solar panel. Inside a CliniPAK are rugged touch-screen laptops loaded with healthcare software which helps a community health worker to diagnose a patient’s symptoms and recommends possible courses of treatment. The laptop is also equipped with a reporting module which stores patient records and can send disease data to a central source, so it can be aggregated. So much paperwork can be involved in making an infectious disease report that clinics sometimes have to allow nurses to do administrative tasks. The CliniPAK is designed to do this automatically. The system also logs a patient’s cell phone so they can be alerted automatically to the need for further treatment and check-ups.

Ideas Value Proposition
Ideas Sustainability
attributions
Contributors to this Page